One in 10 new jobs created in London is in the tech sector

Posts for positions in machine learning and data science have grown by 191% and 136% respectively since 2015

Over 10% of new jobs created in London is in the technology sector, outpacing those in both the financial and professional services sectors, according to research from jobs site Indeed.

London’s job market has reflected the rapid growth of the artificial intelligence (AI) sector in recent years, with the number of posts for roles in machine learning (191%) and data science (136%) having increased dramatically since 2015.

Demand for full stack developers (232.2%) has seen the biggest percentage change over the last couple of years, whilst reliability engineer jobs (160.6%) and roles for development operations managers (134.5%) were also fast growing areas of tech employment.

Junior roles accounted for 10 of the top 20 roles jobseekers were interested in, though roles requiring more experience have proved harder to fill: 44% of the 50 hardest roles to fill were developer positions.

Post-Brexit, the UK saw its desirability as a destination for EU jobseekers drop from 37.2% to 33.8%, through it is still ahead of Germany in second place and France in third.

The news comes in the same week as the capital hosts London Tech Week; an annual celebration of the UK tech sector, bringing together investors, advisors, entrepreneurs, start-ups for a programme of over 200 events.

The event has already seen mayor of London Sadiq Khan unveil a number of major developments including game-changing innovation hubs and incubators.

Raj Mukherjee, senior vice president of product for Indeed, commented:

“The software economy is driving significant new employment opportunities in London, and this is showing up the tech talent shortage, especially where developer and more senior roles are concerned. London is a great place for people to live, and that’s vital because the modern jobseeker optimises for happiness.

“Over the last 100 or so years, we’ve got used to economies where the location of companies determined the location of jobs. The internet era has changed this dynamic.

“We now see talent migrating to places where they want to live, which results in employers creating jobs in those areas. For post-Brexit Britain to be an economic success, it’s going to need to continue to be an attractive place for international talent to live.”

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