Document P’ regulations – a guide for electricians

How the laws on electrical installation may affect your business

Document P is the name of the regulation that affects electricians and other tradespeople. The UK Trades Confederation explains what it will mean for UK firms.

What is it?

Document P is a change in the Building Regulations that affects most domestic electrical works carried out in England and Wales. These jobs must be notified, by law to the local authority building control department. This includes tradesmen who undertake electrical work as part of their normal activities, such as kitchen and bathroom fitters.

Failure to adhere will be a criminal offence and local authorities will have the power to require removal or alteration

When?

The change in law was announced 29th June 2004, and has been effective since 1st January 2005. There was a small transition period to allow contracts signed prior to be installed, but now the new laws are in force so all new works agreed after will have to be installed within new regulations and certified as compliant.

Why?

The Building Act has been revised to include electrical installations to provide protection against their being a source of a fire or a cause of injury.

Who?

Companies or individuals that carry out works, which fall within the scope of PART P have to be approved by one of the government authorised bodies in an assessment format, register all works as compliant and ensure their clients have a certificate to show PART P compliance.

Electrical works carried out that are deemed notifiable and completed in domestic dwellings will need to be registered.

This will include internal and external, such as gardens, sheds, combined business and dwellings, access and amenity areas, such as launderettes (this means the electrical installer carrying out works would need accreditation, even though it isn’t strictly domestic it is designed to contain people).

For more information about Part P, please contact The UK Trades Confederation on 020 8842 4442 or email mail@uktc.org. Visit http://www.uktc.org/ for a support pack that includes a comprehensive guide about Part P and its implications.

Comments

(will not be published)