Positive discrimination will benefit disabled employees

Crown Court case sets precedent for positive discrimination

Employers may be forced to positively discriminate in favour of disabled candidates as a result of a landmark ruling, it was claimed today.

The House of Lords ruling has highlighted how many businesses may be required to hire or promote disabled employees even if they are less qualified for the job, according to law firm Reynolds Porter Chamberlain (RPC).

The case, Archibald v Fife Council, saw Mrs Archibald, an ex-employee of Fife Council, file for a promotion to a less physical job after she suffered complications during surgery.

Mrs Archibald complained that as a disabled person, she should not have been required to go through the competitive interview.

The case led to the judge ruling that as well as reasonable adjustments being made at Fife Council for the employment of disabled staff, Mrs Archibald may be considered for a less physical, higher grade post, without having to compete with other applicants.

In related news, October 1 sees the introduction of new employment laws that make it compulsory for all business to make the necessary adjustments in order to accommodate disabled employees.

However, Simon Whysall, solicitor at RPC, believes the Archibald case may lay down a president which may have serious implications for small business employers.

He said: “The potential scope of the Archibald decision is vast and it does seem to move us further along the path of positive discrimination.

“Employers who want to avoid very expensive claims need to remember that the rule of giving the job to the best candidate is one they may have to bend.”

Fore more information on the Disability Discrimination Act, click here.

Employers may be forced to positively discriminate in favour of disabled candidates as a result of a landmark ruling, it was claimed today.

The House of Lords ruling has highlighted how many businesses may be required to hire or promote disabled employees even if they are less qualified for the job, according to law firm Reynolds Porter Chamberlain (RPC).

The case, Archibald v Fife Council, saw Mrs Archibald, an ex-employee of Fife Council, file for a promotion to a less physical job after she suffered complications during surgery.

Mrs Archibald complained that as a disabled person, she should not have been required to go through the competitive interview.

The case led to the judge ruling that as well as reasonable adjustments being made at Fife Council for the employment of disabled staff, Mrs Archibald may be considered for a less physical, higher grade post, without having to compete with other applicants.

In related news, October 1 sees the introduction of new employment laws that make it compulsory for all business to make the necessary adjustments in order to accommodate disabled employees.

However, Simon Whysall, solicitor at RPC, believes the Archibald case may lay down a president which may have serious implications for small business employers.

He said: “The potential scope of the Archibald decision is vast and it does seem to move us further along the path of positive discrimination.

“Employers who want to avoid very expensive claims need to remember that the rule of giving the job to the best candidate is one they may have to bend.”

Fore more information on the Disability Discrimination Act, click here.

Employers may be forced to positively discriminate in favour of disabled candidates as a result of a landmark ruling, it was claimed today.

The House of Lords ruling has highlighted how many businesses may be required to hire or promote disabled employees even if they are less qualified for the job, according to law firm Reynolds Porter Chamberlain (RPC).

The case, Archibald v Fife Council, saw Mrs Archibald, an ex-employee of Fife Council, file for a promotion to a less physical job after she suffered complications during surgery.

Mrs Archibald complained that as a disabled person, she should not have been required to go through the competitive interview.

The case led to the judge ruling that as well as reasonable adjustments being made at Fife Council for the employment of disabled staff, Mrs Archibald may be considered for a less physical, higher grade post, without having to compete with other applicants.

In related news, October 1 sees the introduction of new employment laws that make it compulsory for all business to make the necessary adjustments in order to accommodate disabled employees.

However, Simon Whysall, solicitor at RPC, believes the Archibald case may lay down a president which may have serious implications for small business employers.

He said: “The potential scope of the Archibald decision is vast and it does seem to move us further along the path of positive discrimination.

“Employers who want to avoid very expensive claims need to remember that the rule of giving the job to the best candidate is one they may have to bend.”

Fore more information on the Disability Discrimination Act, click here.

Employers may be forced to positively discriminate in favour of disabled candidates as a result of a landmark ruling, it was claimed today.

The House of Lords ruling has highlighted how many businesses may be required to hire or promote disabled employees even if they are less qualified for the job, according to law firm Reynolds Porter Chamberlain (RPC).

The case, Archibald v Fife Council, saw Mrs Archibald, an ex-employee of Fife Council, file for a promotion to a less physical job after she suffered complications during surgery.

Mrs Archibald complained that as a disabled person, she should not have been required to go through the competitive interview.

The case led to the judge ruling that as well as reasonable adjustments being made at Fife Council for the employment of disabled staff, Mrs Archibald may be considered for a less physical, higher grade post, without having to compete with other applicants.

In related news, October 1 sees the introduction of new employment laws that make it compulsory for all business to make the necessary adjustments in order to accommodate disabled employees.

However, Simon Whysall, solicitor at RPC, believes the Archibald case may lay down a president which may have serious implications for small business employers.

He said: “The potential scope of the Archibald decision is vast and it does seem to move us further along the path of positive discrimination.

“Employers who want to avoid very expensive claims need to remember that the rule of giving the job to the best candidate is one they may have to bend.”

Fore more information on the Disability Discrimination Act, click here.

Employers may be forced to positively discriminate in favour of disabled candidates as a result of a landmark ruling, it was claimed today.

The House of Lords ruling has highlighted how many businesses may be required to hire or promote disabled employees even if they are less qualified for the job, according to law firm Reynolds Porter Chamberlain (RPC).

The case, Archibald v Fife Council, saw Mrs Archibald, an ex-employee of Fife Council, file for a promotion to a less physical job after she suffered complications during surgery.

Mrs Archibald complained that as a disabled person, she should not have been required to go through the competitive interview.

The case led to the judge ruling that as well as reasonable adjustments being made at Fife Council for the employment of disabled staff, Mrs Archibald may be considered for a less physical, higher grade post, without having to compete with other applicants.

In related news, October 1 sees the introduction of new employment laws that make it compulsory for all business to make the necessary adjustments in order to accommodate disabled employees.

However, Simon Whysall, solicitor at RPC, believes the Archibald case may lay down a president which may have serious implications for small business employers.

He said: “The potential scope of the Archibald decision is vast and it does seem to move us further along the path of positive discrimination.

“Employers who want to avoid very expensive claims need to remember that the rule of giving the job to the best candidate is one they may have to bend.”

Fore more information on the Disability Discrimination Act, click here.

Employers may be forced to positively discriminate in favour of disabled candidates as a result of a landmark ruling, it was claimed today.

The House of Lords ruling has highlighted how many businesses may be required to hire or promote disabled employees even if they are less qualified for the job, according to law firm Reynolds Porter Chamberlain (RPC).

The case, Archibald v Fife Council, saw Mrs Archibald, an ex-employee of Fife Council, file for a promotion to a less physical job after she suffered complications during surgery.

Mrs Archibald complained that as a disabled person, she should not have been required to go through the competitive interview.

The case led to the judge ruling that as well as reasonable adjustments being made at Fife Council for the employment of disabled staff, Mrs Archibald may be considered for a less physical, higher grade post, without having to compete with other applicants.

In related news, October 1 sees the introduction of new employment laws that make it compulsory for all business to make the necessary adjustments in order to accommodate disabled employees.

However, Simon Whysall, solicitor at RPC, believes the Archibald case may lay down a president which may have serious implications for small business employers.

He said: “The potential scope of the Archibald decision is vast and it does seem to move us further along the path of positive discrimination.

“Employers who want to avoid very expensive claims need to remember that the rule of giving the job to the best candidate is one they may have to bend.”

Fore more information on the Disability Discrimination Act, click here.

Employers may be forced to positively discriminate in favour of disabled candidates as a result of a landmark ruling, it was claimed today.

The House of Lords ruling has highlighted how many businesses may be required to hire or promote disabled employees even if they are less qualified for the job, according to law firm Reynolds Porter Chamberlain (RPC).

The case, Archibald v Fife Council, saw Mrs Archibald, an ex-employee of Fife Council, file for a promotion to a less physical job after she suffered complications during surgery.

Mrs Archibald complained that as a disabled person, she should not have been required to go through the competitive interview.

The case led to the judge ruling that as well as reasonable adjustments being made at Fife Council for the employment of disabled staff, Mrs Archibald may be considered for a less physical, higher grade post, without having to compete with other applicants.

In related news, October 1 sees the introduction of new employment laws that make it compulsory for all business to make the necessary adjustments in order to accommodate disabled employees.

However, Simon Whysall, solicitor at RPC, believes the Archibald case may lay down a president which may have serious implications for small business employers.

He said: “The potential scope of the Archibald decision is vast and it does seem to move us further along the path of positive discrimination.

“Employers who want to avoid very expensive claims need to remember that the rule of giving the job to the best candidate is one they may have to bend.”

Fore more information on the Disability Discrimination Act, click here.

Employers may be forced to positively discriminate in favour of disabled candidates as a result of a landmark ruling, it was claimed today.

The House of Lords ruling has highlighted how many businesses may be required to hire or promote disabled employees even if they are less qualified for the job, according to law firm Reynolds Porter Chamberlain (RPC).

The case, Archibald v Fife Council, saw Mrs Archibald, an ex-employee of Fife Council, file for a promotion to a less physical job after she suffered complications during surgery.

Mrs Archibald complained that as a disabled person, she should not have been required to go through the competitive interview.

The case led to the judge ruling that as well as reasonable adjustments being made at Fife Council for the employment of disabled staff, Mrs Archibald may be considered for a less physical, higher grade post, without having to compete with other applicants.

In related news, October 1 sees the introduction of new employment laws that make it compulsory for all business to make the necessary adjustments in order to accommodate disabled employees.

However, Simon Whysall, solicitor at RPC, believes the Archibald case may lay down a president which may have serious implications for small business employers.

He said: “The potential scope of the Archibald decision is vast and it does seem to move us further along the path of positive discrimination.

“Employers who want to avoid very expensive claims need to remember that the rule of giving the job to the best candidate is one they may have to bend.”

Fore more information on the Disability Discrimination Act, click here.

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