Regus opens new business centre on Regent Street

Marks 75th London site to help support UK and international workforce

Global workspace provider Regus has extended its portfolio of business centres with a new opening on Regent Street, marking its 75th London location.

The opening at Rex House, Piccadilly Circus, is specifically targeted at flexible workers and small businesses with facilities including a co-working space, a high-tech business lounge and private offices and meetings rooms that can be hired out for long periods or on a daily basis.

The space also features ‘Thinkpods’, a new concept being rolled-out across its sites, which are enclosed individual desk spaces to enable privacy whilst allowing the user to benefit from an active office environment.

Officially launched last week, the new centre forms part of Regus’ aim to provide UK and international entrepreneurs and businesses with flexible working space and a professional alternative to working from home.

It follows a series of recent expansion for the firm having developed its motorway business centre offering Regus Express with its latest opening on the busy Westbound M4 last month and similar launches over the last year.

With a new business centre opened on a daily basis across its territories since the start of 2013 and plans to have 2000 locations by the end of 2014, Regus is looking for additional ways to fulfil the ‘demand’ for remote workspaces and has plans to bring ‘third place’ centres to UK train-stations.

It is also focusing on its new initiative Regus Connect, due to launch next year, which intends to enable freelancers, interns and businesses to network and work together within 10 sites across the UK.

Discussing its new Regent Street location UK Regus CEO John Spencer commented:

“Opening our 75th centre in London is a significant landmark for us and reflects the tremendous growth in demand for flexible workspace in the city, especially among fast growing ambitious firms.

“Business owners are reassessing their approach to the physical workplace and frequently concluding that full-time, permanent offices are an unnecessary burden, financially and environmentally.”

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