This is how much businesses are willing to pay online influencers…

Marketers are now prepared to pay Snapchat stars as much as £53,000 per snap, as 86% admit they still don't know how to calculate fees for celebs

There’s probably never been a better time to become an online influencer, as a new study from Rakuten Marekting has revealed just how much companies pay social media stars to promote their products.

Its data has revealed that businesses are willing to pay Facebook celebrity influencers up to £75,000 for a single post mentioning their brand, with fashion brands often expected to fork out up to £160,000 per post.

Indeed, marketers are prepared to pay celebrity vloggers and bloggers on Facebook more than their counterparts on YouTube by 12% on average, offering YouTubers £67,000 per video.

How to make money as an online influencer

While ranked fifth among the major social platforms including Twitter and Instagram, marketers are now prepared to pay Snapchat stars as much as £53,000 per Snap.

Rather surprisingly, despite the huge sums of money being exchanged for online promotion, 86% of marketers admit they aren’t entirely sure how influencer fees are calculated, with 38% admitting they can’t tell whether a particular campaign drives sales.

Despite this, 75% of respondents anticipate their spending on such influencer campaigns to rise over the next year and 35% expect it will increase by more than 50% – presenting a valuable opportunity for wannabe social influencers.

Not only a business opportunity for the very famous, micro-influencers with just 10,000 followers can expect to make £1,500 per post on Facebook.

While micro-influencers on Youtube, the best paid in their bracket, can be paid up to £3,000 for a positive review, unboxing video or demo.

James Collins, Rakuten Marketing’s SVP/managing director, global attribution, said:

“Influencer marketing can be hugely effective but marketers are commissioning expensive posts without understanding the real impact on the purchase journey.

“It’s essential that marketers question influencer fees and use attribution tools to measure the effect of this activity in order to create strong, value-driven relationships between brands and influencers.”

If you run a start-up or small business and want to attract some famous faces for your marketing campaigns, read our guide here on how to go about it.

Comments

(will not be published)