UK fifth best country in the world for supporting female entrepreneurs

Britain ranks best on global scorecard for women while India and Bangladesh score lowest overall

Britain is the fifth best country in the world when it comes to supporting female entrepreneurs, it was revealed at the sixth-annual Dell Women’s Entrepreneur Network Summit.

Dell’s Global Women Entrepreneur Leaders Scorecard – which analyses the challenges and opportunities for women business-owners to launch, scale, create jobs and disrupt industries in 31 countries – listed the UK behind the US, Canada, Australia and Sweden.

However, Britain came out on top for equality in a number of categories with 87% of women using the internet and 100% holding bank accounts. Britain was also ranked highest for access to resources such as education and business training programmes for women in business.

The scorecard evaluated five key categories: relative business environments, access to resources, leadership and rights, pipeline for female entrepreneurship and potential for high-growth women-owned businesses.

Over 70% of the countries studied scored below 50% – showing that there is still a considerable gap between female and male-owned businesses. India, Pakistan and Bangladesh scored lowest overall.

Other findings included stats which revealed leadership roles remain largely dominated by men and that access to growth capital and innovation ecosystems is more difficult for women, even in the countries that ranked highest on the scorecard.

Elsewhere, it was revealed that governments play an important role in equality with public procurement accounting for more than 30-40% of GDP in developing countries, and 10-15% in developed countries. Globally, just 1% of public procurement contracts are awarded to female entrepreneurs.

Dr. Ruta Aidis, project director of the Global Women Entrepreneur Leaders Scorecard, commented: “To address the specific challenges for high-impact women entrepreneurs in different countries and regions, it takes a holistic approach.

“Research like the Scorecard is critical to understanding what actions are needed to drive change.”

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